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Which established religions dont allow vaccionations?

On Health & Drugs & Medications » Vaccinations

8,257 words with 18 Comments; publish: Fri, 07 Dec 2007 11:55:00 GMT; (90046.88, « »)

I know in some states people are pressured, even required, to name their religion and it must be an established religion that is known to be against vaccinations. This got me to wondering - what are those religions?

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  • 18 Comments
    • You're not required to disclose your religion in any state. There have been cases in New York, New Jersey, and Wyoming where parents took the school to court and the judge ruled in favor of the parents, saying the Constitution protects their beliefs.

      I know that the Christian Science denomination is against vaccines and medical intervention. There are some others with similar beliefs, the Seventh Day Aventist is one.

      However, all major religions teach people to take care of their bodies. There are several references in the Bible stating against vaccines and against needing a doctor if you are not sick. "Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick; I came not to call the righteous, but sinners." Mark 2:17

      Also, when you write up your exemption, all you need to do is write the exemption part of your state's law, and sign your name. You don't need to have an attorney sign it or notarize it, but some people do.

      #1; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 23:55:00 GMT
    • Jehovah Wittness and Amish are two more. Take your pick!

      I read somewhere there is a site on the web that will sell you a document saying they are an established religion and they will send a paper saying they do not believe in vaccinations.:LOL

      #2; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 23:56:00 GMT
    • Thanks for the answers. I didn't need to know for any reason - my state doesn't require I name my religion. I know what my "religious" beliefs are and why they won't allow me to inject poisons into my child's perfect little body. I just was wondering purely out of curiousity which religions were "recognized" :rolleyes: by the states that have the words "a recognized religion" in their state statutes (albeit unconstitutional as they are).

      Thanks!

      #3; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 23:58:00 GMT
    • ours says that...

      "Religious Exemption

      A _____ Certificate of Religious Exemption may be granted to any student whose parents, parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis signs the appropriate section of the ____ Certificate of Religious Exemption stating they are members of a recognized religious denomination in which the tenets and practices of the religious denomination conflict with immunizations."

      #4; Mon, 10 Dec 2007 23:59:00 GMT
    • Depending on your interpretation of various beliefs, many religions could be interpreted to be against vaxing.

      The book of Leviticus states that one should not use an egg that has blood...blood is taboo...blood is drained and salted out of all red meat...yet even Orthodox Jews permit blood transfusions ...because it is interpreted as saving a life.

      Vaxes are cultured on the organs of animals, and this can be interpreted as against the Noahic laws of eating (using) parts of an animal while it is still alive.

      I guess it is all in the eyes of the interpretor.

      The Roman Catholic Church is against abortion, and many vaxes have been reportedly made from aborted fetuses.

      All depends on the interpretation.

      #5; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:00:00 GMT
    • The Roman Catholic Church is against abortion, and many vaxes have been reportedly made from aborted fetuses.

      Yes, I was just reading that in the Stephanie Cave book - the Rubella portion of the MMR was made from an aborted fetus of a pregnant woman w/ rubella.

      #6; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:01:00 GMT
    • An aborted fetus, that does not necessarily mean that the fetus was induced to abort.

      It could also mean a spontaneous abortion which is a miscarriage.

      So an abortion might in this case mean a miscarriage. :(

      I am no saying that it should be condoned as a growth medium for viruses, but I get a bit perturbed when people equate "abortion" with an 'induced abotion' while the word also could imply a "miscarriage". :(

      So, unless it says "forced abortion" it is not a self-induced act.

      BTW an "ABORT" could also be a bathroom. :LOL

      #7; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:02:00 GMT
    • Dear bjbjd:

      I agree, but nevertheless, I do not think using a dead fetus's body for culturing a vax would be approved of or condoned in the mainstream of Catholic thinking.

      #8; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:03:00 GMT
    • I do know for a fact that many Hindu sects do not permit vaccinating because it is made from the body of an animal.

      My BIL told me this, and he has been affiliated with the Aryuvedic movement for 30+ years.

      #9; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:04:00 GMT
    • === Original Words ===

      applejuice

      The book of Leviticus states that one should not use an egg that has blood...

      Ummm I cant find anything about this in the Bible:scratch I just went through a concordance and I read the few mention of eggs but nothing to do about blood in them.

      So where are you finding this about eggs with blood in them?

      #10; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:05:00 GMT
    • === Original Words ===

      bjbjd

      Jehovah Wittness and Amish are two more.

      JWs used to be against vaccines, now it's a matter of personal choice. :thumb

      #11; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:06:00 GMT
    • bjbjd - If I'm not mistaken, the Stephanie Cave book explains that this was a woman who had an abortion b/c she got rubella while pregnant. This is what I remember - don't have it in front of me right now, so sorry if this is wrong.

      Anybody know?

      #12; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:07:00 GMT
    • Yes, the fetuses used to make the rubella, chickenpox, and hepatitis A vaccines were from women who had abortions. There are three different cell lines, MRC-5, WI-31, and I forget the other one.

      There is a Catholic organization called Children of God for Life and they are trying to stop the use of aborted fetal tissue in vaccines. http://www.cogforlife.org

      #13; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:08:00 GMT
    • === Original Words ===

      applejuice

      Dear bjbjd:

      I agree, but nevertheless, I do not think using a dead fetus's body for culturing a vax would be approved of or condoned in the mainstream of Catholic thinking.

      Good point, I am Catholic and our Church is against both abortions and stem cell research.

      #14; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:09:00 GMT
    • Dear momto l&a:

      Blood is taboo in all of "classic" Jewish teachings. Even if a woman is having her period, she has been admonished to stay home. That is in the old times.

      Strictly speaking, the treatment of blood is taboo throughout the Torah.

      Blood is not to be eaten and is salted out of meat. I have worked with kosher food preparations and the accepted practice is to throw out any eggs with blood on them. I know this is an interpretation of the blood taboos, but this is the extent to which blood is kept out of food and not eaten.

      Blood transfusions and vaccines are a modern development and their accepted use are part of modern interpretations of the Torah - modern Jewish thinking accepts them because they have been lead to believe that they are for a higher good, i.e., which is to save a life, the unknown side-effects not withstanding.

      #15; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:10:00 GMT
    • It is trouble. If it goes to court, the judge will question whether your religious beliefs are sincere, and it will not look good if you recently found a fly-by-night church to join to get out of your vaxes.

      Some states have a philosophical exemption. And if that is what your objection is, but your state has a religious exemption, only then you are out of luck, if questioned.

      Some folks make a very elaborate religious exemption letter, but we have made ours a one-sentence letter:

      "We decline to vaccinate our daughter as a result of our religious beliefs."

      Simple, to the point - and nothing to cross-examine. We happen to be religious, but feel it is no business of the court which religion we happen to be: we are students of Christian Science, but not yet members. The point is, the court will try to find if you are sincere.

      #16; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:11:00 GMT
    • I wouldn't shop for a religion to opt out of vaccines.

      I didn't need to know for any reason - my state doesn't require I name my religion. I know what my "religious" beliefs are and why they won't allow me to inject poisons into my child's perfect little body. I just was wondering purely out of curiousity which religions were "recognized" by the states that have the words "a recognized religion" in their state statutes (albeit unconstitutional as they are).

      I'm not shopping for anything. As I stated already, this was purely curiosity stemming from a conversation with a friend.

      #17; Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:12:00 GMT